New Age Ridiculousness at Columbia University Program by Sam Abelow

Among his seemingly random meanderings throughout the class, events that took place included, a girl crying to the class for 20 minutes about the very personal death of her grandfather, a loose discussion on the concept of time and how we don’t live in the moment, several aggressive table pounds by the professor, and a couple of phrases that made shallow sense, like “life doesn’t go fast, we go fast”.

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Paul Gauguin: Desire and Immortality by Sam Abelow

Paul Gauguin, a painter of the 1890’s, achieved an immortality through his art. Much of his drive to create was a compulsion in which he sacrificed his well-being to achieve. Yet, the contents of his imagination and intellect live on in the cultural canon of Western art, and his aesthetics propagated a new vision of art, influencing the likes of Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. The psychological power behind such a drive will be explored in this essay, along with much more.

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The Garden Soirée: Communal Transcendence by Sam Abelow

While ambient, acoustic music played over a speaker, guests arrived in their unusual outfits, which expressed an elegance of earlier centuries. Ken, who is in his late seventies, wore a Kaftan, and his wife a vintage Eastern robe, with an antique metal belt. Robin and her boyfriend Jason arrived in the utmost majesty. She wore a delicate floral headdress and Kimono-Like gown. Jason described his one-of-a-kind ceremonial robe.

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An Artist’s Case for the Moderation of Technology by Sam Abelow

The excessive technological stimulation causes many of us to ignore the Life which exists in slow and open moments when we are able to absorb each other and the world around us. Recognition of the downtempo pace of a pre-technological existence is a needed counterbalance.

Flashy screens, moving images, endless songs to stream and infinite news stories are all alluring. Widely accessible content, from comedy to calamity, becomes addictive to our minds which are designed for curiosity. Please, in the days after reading this pay attention to your own habits.

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Living Myths in Paint: Sandro Chia Exhibit by Sam Abelow

There are two painters I currently admire above all the rest, although there are many examples enduring works of art. The first is Paul Gauguin, who painted actively in the late 1890’s. The second is Sandro Chia. I attended Chia’s first exhibit in New York City after a decade, at the Marc Straus gallery this late winter, early spring 2017. On display were a couple dozen affecting and mature paintings.

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Trumpism and the Neglected Archetypal Feminine by Sam Abelow

In order to bring a more comprehensive scope and even more depth to the study of the archetypal dynamics at play in politics and social movements today, we must recognize the role of the archetypal Feminine[1]. The social turmoil and divisive politics in the United States and Europe, all of which terrify, yet also excite and stir change — as seen in movement and countermovement, progression and reaction — are all contained within the most essential and primordial archetype of all: The Great Mother.

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Bon Iver's Esoteric Digital Daydream: 22, A Million by Sam Abelow

Justin Vernon spontaneously materialized, instantly finding a place in the playlists of American and European listeners in 2007, with the release of his album “For Emma, Forever Ago.” Heart wrenching and vulnerable, stripped down and timeless, that first album proved original enough for hipsters and accessible enough for soccer moms.

The mythology around Bon Iver began with that first album: he had broken up with his girlfriend and his band, contracted a serious illness, recovered and retreated to isolation in the woods of Wisconsin. There he hunted for his food and stayed in his father’s cabin.

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A Revival in Motherhood: Viral Video of Home Birth by Sam Abelow

For a long time I have been fascinated with the processes of conception, pregnancy and birth. This interest was sparked when I saw the Business of Being Born. The documentaries overview of the modern history of birthing practices is fascinating and disturbing.

I find the trend towards simplifying, back to a woman's natural, instinctive power, combined with use of breath and mindfulness to be an astonishing revival, rich with everything good about humanity.

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Artists Role in a Selfie Generation: Melody Mouthpiece Versus Authentic Artistry by Sam Abelow

Some of the most influential and idealistic songwriters, like John Lennon, have claimed that music can change the world. Other musicians, like Bono, have used their fame to effect political change. On the other hand, much of the popular music today self-orientated and superficial. Even still, this is entertainment; an example of music as not-so-much saving the world, but making it a less shitty place to be.

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Easter: Osiris, Christ and Myths of Transformation by Sam Abelow

The instinct that we must “sacrifice” to have the renewal is a fundamental representation of experience, found in our instinctual psyche. Our ancestors experienced the outside world, and inner world as a continuum. This meant that psychological processes had to be practiced outwardly to encourage consciousness, or rather capability towards sustaining themselves

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